Zechariah 9:7

It too shall be a remnant for our God;
It shall be like a clan in Judah...
Zechariah 9:7
For over a year now, I’ve questioned the wisdom of the Holy Spirit, who nudged me to study the book of Zechariah in depth.

Zechariah, God? Are you sure? How about something more comprehensible, like one of the gospels, or more practical, like one of Paul’s epistles?

I imagine God shaking his head at my objections. Either that or he’s chuckling at my list of suggestions. Instead he pours grace upon my head and grants me a glimpse of his purposes behind studying a man who died 2,500 years ago. In the process, he pulls back the veil a tiny bit to reveal his ability weave together events across time and space.
           
The glimpse began when a friend gave me a book after her mother died. ‘I found it while we cleaned Mom’s house. It made me think of you.’

I took The Inextinguishable Symphony by Martin Goldsmith home and added it to the stack on my nightstand. It sat there for months until December until I needed something to read. History sprang to life as the Goldsmith told the story of his parents who were Jewish symphony musicians in Germany during Hitler’s rise. They met, married and emigrated to the United States on one of the last refuge ships to sail before the Nazis sealed the borders.

The parallels between Goldsmith’s book and Zechariah were striking. Over and over, the prophet repeated God’s promise to preserve a remnant from among the Jewish exiles in Babylon. He also prophesied both the triumphant arrival of the Messiah in Jerusalem and God’s plan to make other nations part of his family, too.

As I read The Inextinguishable Symphony and studied Zechariah, God’s voice whispered to my heart. I’m working among the nations, preserving my remnant when all seems lost. I did it then. I’m doing it now. And I’m at work in your life, too.

The vast and personal reach of God’s hand is mysterious and great. Why would he weave together the Babylonian exile, the atrocities of Nazi Germany, the loss of a friend’s mom, and Zechariah to show himself to me? I have no answer other than a deepening assurance of God’s willingness to reveal himself when people study his word.

This kind of assurance provides hope for everyone who hungers for a glimpse of God’s purposes in this uncertain summer, and it’s available to everyone who seeks him in scripture. All he asks is that we read what he has written and rest in him each day. Then we can watch him simultaneously reveal himself and grow our faith in mysterious, unexpected, soul-satisfying ways.
Jolene Philo | Author

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